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Please Be Aware! (-USA-)

Discussion in 'Adoptions' started by Claudia807, Jul 23, 2001.

  1. belleboxer

    belleboxer Boxer Booster

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    difficult subject

    Hi Everyone...I usually don't post here but was surfing for a lost/found section tonite and starting reading these posts. As the contact person for Lone Star Boxer Rescue in Houston, I know how hard this is. I believe that every situation is unique and each individual should be looked at just as that, an individual. We follow some specific guidelines, but there are exceptions. I wish things could be perfect, but it's almost impossibe, the alternative would be many boxers being euthanized. For me, rescue is a collective effort among many people who love animals, period. Yes, there are red flags, but those red flags should be investigated and sometimes it's just a matter of education. For example: issues regarding crate training, pets being outside part of the day, acclaimating with other pets, vet care, etc. Until one works actively with rescue, it is hard to say how you would handle a situation...I know my heart and soul go into this, this is more of a full time job than my own business lately and the burn out factor is huge, but everytime I see another success story of a dog that probably would not have made it out of the pound, it makes it all worth it. So, I guess my point is for those in rescue is to follow the guideline, but also, go with your gut and look at applicants individually. I know we all agree that we want good, loving, permanent homes for our rescues...and with education, intuition and faith, it does work out for the best. Happy New Year Everyone!
    :)Sharon
    www.lonestarboxerrescue.com
     
  2. MarleysMom

    MarleysMom Guest

    I was refused a rescue, and was also refused an explanation as to why. I was very discouraged and disappointed with the rescue program in my area and I had given up on rescuing another Boxer. I started to watching the local humane societies waiting for a Boxer to come in, and sure enough, as soon as I started watching, Kaya was surrendered to a humane society 3 hours away. I immediately put in an application for her and even though she already had several applications in for her, they choose me. The same day, I took Marley down to Austin to visit Kaya and we ended up taking her home that night! To this day I am still bothered with the way that I was treated at the rescue and I will never go to a rescue again. I would rather give my money for much needed resources at the local humane society. So, to all of you trying to rescue - keep your eyes peeled for the dogs that come into the humane society. I just wonder why the humane society saw that I was the best candidate for Kaya, but the rescue did not?!?!?!?! Go figure :rolleyes:
     
  3. clovick2000

    clovick2000 Boxer Buddy

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    What really sounds "fishy" here to me is that they wouldn't tell you a REASON that they denied you to adopt.
    :confused:

    You're correct- you CAN find boxers in Humane Society's, also in city shelters all over, anyone would just have to wait patiently. :)
     
  4. mmccown

    mmccown Boxer Booster

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    Linda, pickles, Claudia and Aimee, Thank you. Rescue is so close to my heart, I get really bent out of shape when I see something that makes legitimate groups looks bad. BelleBoxer, Liz and Debbie are right on, education is the key. It is so tricky these days not to offend anyone. Frankly I would rather offend someone and ensure my dog was placed into a loving home.

    Are there exceptions to our criteria? Sure, in certain cases, there are. But the criteria was established for a reason. In my experience, the red flags were a good sign to check out a potential adopter a little closer. It is a shame rescue groups have to exist, but as long as there is a need, I will be diligent, and yes, bitchy if I have to be, to ensure the safety of Boxers everywhere.

    Again, thanks for your comments and please follow your gut if something doesn't feel right. Where I live we have an inordinate amount of stolen dogs (all breeds) and when I asked the police about it I was told that there are rings that steal dogs from backyards to use in dog fighting or to resell/adopt for a money making scheme. I was also told that small dogs were used for bait and large dogs like Boxers and Rottis were used to fight. SO, maybe I am a little paranoid.

    My point is pay attention, be responsible and love your baby dogs.
     
  5. ringwise

    ringwise Boxer Buddy

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    I am involved in rescue (federally registered non-profit). We do not, as a rule, tell applicants why they are being denied. We feel that if we do, they'll just omit that little detail on their application to the next rescue group. Our rescue group never adopts to smokers (don't flame us for this. The breed is pug, and it is our opinion that more flat faced dogs get nasal cancer and lung cancer than long-nosed dogs. They don't have adequate filtration because their nose is shorter) . A few years ago, we did a home check on a man looking to adopt, and noticed signs in the home that he smoked. When we questioned him, he told us that he had put on his application that he was a non-smoker because he had been rejected by another group because he smoked. He was immediately denied - really was a smoker and lied on his application.

    We did go for a period of time in our group where the "powers that be" decided that they wouldn't adopt to anyone that worked out of their home, crated their dogs EVER, had certain breeds of dogs, or had a doggie door. We eventually educated those folks about these issues, and explained that each situation should be evaluated individually. Right now, our group only has one Red Flag - the smoking issue. My point is, if you've been rejected, try another rescue group. Not all are educated on what makes a great home (they mean well, but don't have experience). Just make sure that you are truthful on your application.

    We've only had 3 dogs returned to us in the 6 years that I've been involved in rescue. One was for health reasons (long distance truck driver couldn't manage a diabetic dog, and 2 that were adopted out by the former "powers that be" - mom was home all day, and the kids' lives took over and the dogs were eventually left in the backyard.) That's why the application is so involved - rescue wants to find forever homes.

    Laurie
     
  6. Claudia807

    Claudia807 Completely Boxer Crazy

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    You're replying to a thread that's a few years old here, but . . . The original point of the thread was to give people some questions to ask when dealing with rescues. The sub-standard rescue that I mentioned in my original post is still up and running (it's an all-breed rescue network that doesn't bother with any pesky stuff like veterinary care). Rescue is somewhat of a trendy thing and people really like to feel like they've "rescued" something. But they need to do their homework and make sure the organization is legitimate.

    I agree with you that rescues do not have to tell people why they'be been declined. If an applicant figures out what the "problem" was, they will change their response when they apply with another rescue. However, I disagree that people should keep applying far and wide with different rescues (operating on the assumption that the first rescue that declined them may not have known what they were talking about or might have had policies that are unreasonable). I continue to feel that people should work with the rescue closest to them - it's not hard to find out if that rescue is a reputable one or not. The exception might be if you have multiple rescues that cover your city. In that case, I think it's only fair to let each rescue know that you are applying with others. It's not cool to have so many volunteers duplicating efforts by processing applications from the same person.

    I have seen a few cases where someone became irked at their local rescue and found one several states away willing to adopt to them. A reputable rescue will not place a dog far away without a home check. What happens if the dog needs to be returned? It brings up a whole host of other issues.

    Claudia
    Green Acres Boxer Rescue of WI
     
  7. carmenmiles

    carmenmiles Boxer Buddy

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    boxer resuce

    I applied to resuce a boxer or to be a foster home. I would love to do this. I give Miles a great home and give him the world just like my own children and would love to help a boxer who is in need until they got a home or I would want to adopt. I put my application on a boxer website for Missouri but I have not heard a thing from them. No email or phone call or anything.. I would be a great home for a dog who needs it. I love my Miles so much and I think all dogs deserve a good home and loving parents. We move around every few years and all my animals have moved with me and went on vactaion with me.. Let me know of any dogs who are in the Missouri area that may need a helping hand.
     
  8. Claudia807

    Claudia807 Completely Boxer Crazy

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    I am not affiliated with that rescue, of course, so I don't have any idea, but I did see two things in your post that might cause a problem. One is that you applied to rescue (I assume you meant "to adopt" - the dogs are already rescued) or to be a foster home. I know that with our rescue, we ask people to decide either way. If they are going to foster, they can't go adopting all the dogs we send them. That isn't really fair to applicants that have been waiting patiently. If they are leaning towards adopting, we encourage them to do that instead. Maybe the rescue to which you applied is confused about what your intentions are.

    Second, you mentioned that you "move around every few years." As rescues we put a lot of training into our foster parents. We might be hesitant to invest all of that time, money, and energy if we know for a fact that someone is going to move away shortly.

    Perhaps you could contact the rescue and ask them if they received your application. Maybe they have just been too busy to process it. I'm sure it's not that they don't appreciate your interest in helping.

    Claudia
    Green Acres Boxer Rescue of WI
     
  9. blueeyedlady

    blueeyedlady Boxer Pal

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    Thanks

    I am very glad someone chose to post this thread. My fiance and I have been condsidering adopting a rescue boxer as a new member of our family and as a friend for our boxer Boomer. We have both been somewhat afraid of adopting a rescue because of the possible issues they may have as a result of treatment earlier in life. We bought Boomer from a breeder when he was just a baby and have loved him to the point that he thinks everybody should be his best friend. We are both a bit afraid of adopting an older dog that might have some issues attached. This post really helped me know what to look for in a rescue and in a rescue boxer.
    Thanks again,
    ~Jennifer, David and Boomer
     
  10. Claudia807

    Claudia807 Completely Boxer Crazy

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    I'm glad you found the thread to be helpful. I posted it three years ago and I still think it's valid. As far as adopting an older dog . . . if you don't feel comfortable with it, don't feel obligated to pursue it. But if you think this is something you might be interested in, don't be afraid to ask lots of questions. The rescue folks shouldn't mind answering them. They will tell you everything they know about a dog. Sometimes they have a full history on a dog, sometimes not.

    You can also look at it this way . . . a lot of us raise dogs from scratch that still end up having issues! I have seen a lot of dogs come through our rescue that have had absolutely stellar temperaments. A lot also depends on what your tolerance level is. To me the only deal-breaker is aggression towards people, and a good rescue won't place a dog like that anyway. Almost anything below that (separation anxiety, mild to moderate dog-dog aggression) is workable. But to some, even one potty accident on the floor puts them over the edge. So be honest about what worries you.

    Claudia
    Green Acres Boxer Rescue of WI
     

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