1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

When are male boxers ready to mate?

Discussion in 'Dog Health issues and questions' started by brittany1984, Dec 30, 2005.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. brittany1984

    brittany1984 Boxer Booster

    Joined:
    Nov 14, 2005
    Messages:
    140
    Likes Received:
    0
    I was just wondering about what time in a male boxers life they start wanting to mate.
     
  2. gmacleod

    gmacleod Elusive Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jun 3, 2002
    Messages:
    15,273
    Likes Received:
    1
    Wanting to? Well, as soon as they reach puberty. That's anywhere from about 6-9 months usually, possibly a little earlier in some cases. It is perfectly possible that a pubescent male would be technically capable of mating too, so it's very important that a young dog is never allowed in contact with an in-heat bitch. And is another reason why males should preferably be neutered before 6 months of age.
     
  3. Vela

    Vela Boxer Insane

    Joined:
    Apr 30, 2003
    Messages:
    2,139
    Likes Received:
    0
    If your boy isn't neutered by now he really should be soon. It helps keep them from undesireable behaviors like mounting things, people, etc., marking his territory, often inside the house, and trying to get away and run loose to find any female in heat. Males should only be left intact if they are of proper conformation for breeding, which can be found out by showing and having him evalauted by an unbiased judge of the breed, having extensive health testing as explained in the health testing forum above (which incidentally cannot be fully completed before 24 months of gage), and in the care of an experienced breeder or someone who is being mentored by an experienced responsible breeder. Intact males can often be quite troublesome and it's better for the dog to be neutered before puberty actually hits.
     
  4. courtney323

    courtney323 Energetic Moderator<br><img src="/forums/images/mo

    Joined:
    May 22, 2002
    Messages:
    3,147
    Likes Received:
    0
    And if you are asking when he will be ready to mate, the answer is after he has proven himself champion in the show ring, and been fully health tested.

    Health testing cannot fully be accomplished until he is about 2 years of age. Tests you would need to perform can be found at www.boxerworld.com/health_testing.

    :)
     
  5. brittany1984

    brittany1984 Boxer Booster

    Joined:
    Nov 14, 2005
    Messages:
    140
    Likes Received:
    0
    Thanks for your replies. So I should wait till he is 2 years old to breed him? Duke has great blood lines. His mother was a champion and so was his grandfather. Duke doesnt even lift his leg yet, he just stands there and pees. An unusual thing he does is when my other dog Roxie is laying down or just sitting there ( she is fixed) Duke will go over and sit on her or stand over her. When they play Duke always jumps on her back. IS this a sign of puberty? He is so weird sometimes..lol
     
  6. gmacleod

    gmacleod Elusive Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jun 3, 2002
    Messages:
    15,273
    Likes Received:
    1
    You should wait until he has proven himself in the show ring as being a good enough representative of the breed to be bred from, and then has passed all of the necessary screening for genetically inheritable disease.

    Since some of those tests cannot be completed until the dog is 2 years old, then by definition that means he can't be bred until after that age.

    That part, I'm afraid, isn't actually relevant ;) Duke needs to be a champion, or good enough to be one (as assessed by someone qualified to do so - meaning a judge). What his parents or other relatives achieved doesn't count for much if Duke himself isn't up to the same standard. That's actually what conformation showing is about - selection of breeding stock. And if the dog isn't good enough, or you're not prepared to have him assessed, then he simply shouldn't be bred at all.
     
  7. Del T.

    Del T. Boxer Buddy

    Joined:
    Apr 18, 2005
    Messages:
    32
    Likes Received:
    0
    Based on your statements about the parents/grandparents "champion" status not being relevant to a descendant, then why does it matter if he is a champion or not? Seems to me that the genetically inherited diseases should be the only concern of breeding.
     
  8. Vela

    Vela Boxer Insane

    Joined:
    Apr 30, 2003
    Messages:
    2,139
    Likes Received:
    0
    I agree wholeheartedly! There are too many boxers already out there with inheritable diseases that should never have been passed on. If you are not planning to show him then how will you determine if he is of proper conformation to improve the breed? If you don't get him a championship, or at least som epoints earned in the show ring, why spend the thousands of dollars on the health testing? He needs to have hips x-rays, holter monitor done on his heart, and many other tests you can read about in the Health Testing section above. Only if he passes those first two "tests" should he even be considered for breeding, and only then with an experienced breeder or with you havnig an expericned RESPONSIBLE ethical breeder mentoring you. Breeding is not to be taken lightly and certainly isn't here. If you intend to be a back yard breeder who refuses to do the right things by your dog and the breed, then please go elsewhere it's not welcome here. If you want to be a responsible ethical breeder and do what's right by your dog and by the Boxer breed as a whole, then please stay you wold be most welcome here. If you have no intentions of doing the necessary and required things to insure he should even be bred, then you aren't a responsible breeder. I hope you are interested in going about it correctly because we need more repsonsible breeders, what we don't need are more dogs bred because someone thinks they are the perfect example of the breed and only wants either money, or a cute puppy from their "favorite dog".
     
  9. gmacleod

    gmacleod Elusive Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jun 3, 2002
    Messages:
    15,273
    Likes Received:
    1
    Really? You don't want a boxer that actually looks like the breed is supposed to, and has the correct temperament too?

    That is what conformation showing is for ;) To assess whether or not the dog is a good enough representative of the breed to produce the next generation. That is primarily in construction, and secondarily in temperament. And yes, it does matter if the dog looks more like a bullmastiff than a boxer and has a temperament more like a terrier. Breed a few generations of dogs without consideration of the standard (blueprint for the breed), and pretty soon you've got dogs that barely resemble boxers at all.

    You might not care if your pet boxer has a slightly long muzzle. But take that a few generations further, and you end up with a dog that looks nothing like a boxer at all. And how about the temperament? That is supremely important - people choose dogs because the characteristics of the breed are going to fit their lifestyle and family. And when the dog turns out nothing remotely like that, the sad fact is that they end in shelters. So it is most certainly relevant, and health (whilst being extremely important) can never be the only consideration.

    The dog has to pass BOTH tests. And if it doesn't, then it is not breeding material. Period. (And hey, it's not as though there's any shortage of dogs that DO meet both criteria - why would you breed from inferior ones?)

    Whether or not the dog's parents and grandparents were correct boxers (in construction and temperament) actually is *not* particularly relevant. It's nice, for sure. But it means nothing if the individual you're actually proposing to breed from is himself incorrect.
     
  10. Del T.

    Del T. Boxer Buddy

    Joined:
    Apr 18, 2005
    Messages:
    32
    Likes Received:
    0
    Ok. I think I understand better now.

    I guess my previous post was me thinking more of "show" as being able to listen and walk and sit, etc. I didn't stop to think about markings and stance, etc.

    Rocket is our first boxer so we have a lot to learn. I have been reading about the markings, gait, head proportions and all that. He is also VERY intelligent. We have been through 3 "semesters" and he does very will with (unfortunetly due to me) minimal home practice time.

    We are still thinking about breeding him (definately the right way) so this is why we haven't neutered him.

    I am going to look at the local Boxer Club here in AZ and see about becoming a member.

    I love this site and the information it provides. However, sometimes it seems like the word is "No One" should breed their Boxer.

    Thanks for clarifying the breeding issue for me :)
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page