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Titer Testing

Discussion in 'Dog Health issues and questions' started by x19er, Dec 14, 2015.

  1. x19er

    x19er Boxer Insane

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    Just wondering if anyone does Titer Testing rather than yearly vaccinations? Our non Boxer is due what we call here in the UK her 'annual booster' vaccination and rather than automatically getting it done we're thinking of getting her Titer Tested to see if she actually needs it done.

    Has anyone got any feedback on going down this route - have you had to get the vaccination after the testing anyway/has your dog still got enough antibodies years later after puppy vaccinations/how often do you test? Any info would be great.

    Phoned our vets to discuss and I had to spell the test for the lady on reception who had no idea what it was so not sure what the feedback from our vet is going to be!

    Thanks folks.
     
  2. Jan

    Jan Reasonable Moderator Staff Member

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    I have considered doing titers, but never actually have. I just don't re-vaccinate. Most diseases are puppy diseases and they will rarely kill an adult dog. I just hope that they have built up enough antibodies for life.

    When I asked my vet about titers, he said that they don't know what level of titer is needed to provide immunity, so he wouldn't do it. I just didn't re-vaccinate. The only one vaccination, my dogs will get in the future is rabies. I will probably do that one again in a few years.
     
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  3. Roge

    Roge Boxer Insane

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    I don't vaccinate unless I have to , unfortunately next year I will have to because my whole family are going abroad for my sons wedding and Roge will have to go to kennels and they won't take him unless he has his shots ..
     
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  4. silly24boxer

    silly24boxer Super Boxer

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    Here in Canada A Rabies titer is not recognized yet but I would do titers testing for everything else after the age of five. You may be surprised at what you find out. Apparently I understand they are trying to make titer testing more available and affordable here and I cannot wait until this happens. Apparently it's not a read as a level, either the dog has antibodies or it doesn't.
     
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  5. Jan

    Jan Reasonable Moderator Staff Member

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  6. whiskers

    whiskers Boxer Insane

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    Same here. Juno hasn't had any vaccines since she was 1 year old (she'll be 7 in a couple months) and I have not checked titers either. I figure those vaccines + any exposure just from being out in the world is enough to keep her immune system recognizing those diseases.
     
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  7. x19er

    x19er Boxer Insane

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    Bloods taken today, results will be interesting.
     
  8. TwoDogs

    TwoDogs Boxer Insane

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    I titer all my dogs. Rabies is required by law, so I vaccinate for that but I titer for Parvo and Distemper. I am lucky in that there is a kennel near me that will accept a dog that has titers that show probable immunity. They require an additional waiver to be signed by the owner. I use a pet sitter that comes to the house anyways, but it's nice to know that I have a kennel option available.

    My male was vaccinated by the humane society when I got him at 2.5 years old. It was unknown if he had been vaccinated prior to that. Within a year he developed immune mediated hemolytic anemia but recovered. My vet recommended running titers as an alternative to vaccines after that. We ran titers every year and results always came back well in the range of probable immunity. Two years ago, when he was eight, his titers for Parvo came back acceptable but low. My vet said that the following year we might need to vaccinate. The next year we ran his titers expecting to see even lower numbers but were surprised to see that his antibody levels were very high. He had clearly been exposed to Parvo during that year and his immune system responded appropriately. Based on his new, higher levels the vet assured me that we didn't need to revaccinate.

    While some people don't vaccinate and don't feel the need to titer, doing so gives me peace of mind knowing that my dogs' antibodies levels are high enough that their immune systems will be able to respond to the pathogens. My vet feels comfortable with not vaccinating only if titers are run each year. It is pricey, but I'm lucky in that I can afford it. Some vets are comfortable running titers on the same schedule that vaccinations would be given, so that would be every 3 years for Parvo and Distemper.
     
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  9. x19er

    x19er Boxer Insane

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    We lost our Boxer girl to immune mediated hemolytic anemia in 2014, therefore our vet is totally on board with us doing titers on our 'new' dogs - they are both rescues who have had their initial puppy vaccinations. I totally agree TwoDogs, I would not be happy leaving them unvaccinated without making sure they have enough antibodies. Yes, it costs more and we may have to vaccinate anyway but after living through trying to save Charlie I would pay anything quite frankly to limit the risks of immune mediated hemolytic anemia for our current dogs.
     

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