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reversed brindle?

Discussion in 'Showing - questions and answers' started by brandynicole, Jan 29, 2010.

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  1. brandynicole

    brandynicole Boxer Pal

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    I saw a previous thread that says that reverse brindle boxers can be shown, however, i am looking at buying one this weekend. She is so dark she literally looks black. Is this not acceptable for breeding, eventhough, she is AKC registered? Please advise. I want to show my puppy and dont want to make the wrong decision.
     
  2. gmacleod

    gmacleod Elusive Moderator Staff Member

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    Reverse brindles can certainly be shown :) They're no different from any other brindle dog - all we're talking about when we call a brindle dog "reverse" brindle is how many dark stripes it has (in some other parts of the world, the exact same dog would be described as either "dark" or "seal" brindle). There are other descriptions for the various shades/concentrations of brindling - like "light" brindle (very few stripes, and "red", "golden", "fawn" or "mahogany" brindle, which tend more to describe the shade of the fawn base coat rather than the number of brindle stripes. There is absolutely nothing genetically different between any of them, and all are equally acceptable colours. All the breed standard asks is that the stripes be clear/distinct.

    A reverse brindle that has so many stripes as to appear almost black is not of itself a problem. And I would note that the stripes tend to "spread out" as the puppy grows up, so you usually see more of the fawn base colour on an adult than you did on the same dog as a puppy (in much the same way as white markings disappear).

    HOWEVER: having said that, DO make very sure that this puppy does actually have stripes, and is not in fact solid black. If it looks black from a distance, or in photos (quite common), but up close you can see clearly that she is in fact clearly brindle - lots of dark stripes on her fawn background - then there is absolutely no reason not to buy her (and show her, if you choose). If you cannot find any evidence of stripes though - meaning that she is in fact solid black - then RUN away and find another breeder. A solid black dog *cannot* be a purebred boxer - it is a genetic impossibility. The genes that cause brindling and those that cause solid black coat colour are very different. And the latter does not exist within the boxer breed (meaning that to get a black dog, you MUST have mixed with some other breed, such as labs, that carry that gene). Rather like it's impossible to get a harlequin or a brindle german shepherd - it simply doesn't exist in purebred GSDs (but you might get one if, for example, you crossed the GSD with a great dane - a breed that does have those coat colours).
     
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