1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

question about testing

Discussion in 'Boxer Anatomy and Physiology' started by KMB's BabyB, Oct 30, 2005.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. KMB's BabyB

    KMB's BabyB Boxer Booster

    Joined:
    May 7, 2005
    Messages:
    168
    Likes Received:
    0
    okay we got our dog from a backyard breeder. After(of course) I read about all the health tests that need to be done. If my dog were to have any of these problems could anything be done about it. I guess what I am asking is if I don't plan on breeding her do I need to test her? Would it be a good idea? ANd also her heart was fine before her ear crop(nine weeks). Can genetically related heart problems show up after that? I don't have any health concerns for her at this time I just want to make sure I do the right thing by my little byb puppy:)
     
  2. gmacleod

    gmacleod Elusive Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jun 3, 2002
    Messages:
    15,273
    Likes Received:
    2
    The sort of health screening that should be conducted prior to breeding won't do any more than identify the presence of conditions. In most cases, no there is not a lot that can be done about them. That is one reason why it is so imperative that dogs be tested before they're bred - because once they've passed those genes onto any offspring, it is too late.

    If you don't plan on breeding your dog, then there is not a great deal of point in having those tests done. Not unless any problems show up later in life, anyway.

    Sorry, having no apparent heart problems at nine weeks means nothing in regards to the development of cardiomyopathy or aortic stenosis. Most dogs will be at very least two years old - and more likely four or five before some problems were apparent. Unless it was a very severe case, anyway. Again - that is why breeding stock needs to be tested for disease. Because it will never be apparent from just looking at them, or from an examination by a vet. To diagnose Boxer Cadiomyopathy (arrythmic right ventricular cardiomyopathy), a dog needs to wear a heart monitor for a 24 hour period. If it's breeding stock, that's a test that needs to be repeated annually.

    Hip dysplasia is diagnosed by x-ray. While it is possible for a dog to be diagnosed at an early age, it cannot be definitely cleared until 24 months minimum age...

    Anyway - there is not a lot of point in spending the money having your puppy tested for those diseases. For a start she's far too young, but secondarily, if she's never going to be used as breeding stock, it's less important. You can hold off on the need for any tests at all unless she begins to show symptoms of the disease. Since these things are genetic, there isn't really anything you could do to prevent them developing if they are going to.
     
  3. KMB's BabyB

    KMB's BabyB Boxer Booster

    Joined:
    May 7, 2005
    Messages:
    168
    Likes Received:
    0
    Thanks

    I kind of figured that it was too late to avoid genetic issues if there will be any, but I wanted to be certain I do the right thing from here on out. When I go to buy my next boxer(after we move and Freya is older) How many generations back should I look for health testing?
     
  4. boxer

    boxer Boxer Insane

    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2004
    Messages:
    1,889
    Likes Received:
    0
    The more generations the better :)

    Getting a puppy from health tested parents isn't a total guarantee that the puppy will never suffer from genetically inheritable diseases. It certainly dramatically reduces the risk, but it's not a total guarantee (nothing can be). That is because inheritance of these diseases isn't a simple dominant or recessive, and unaffected dogs can sometimes still be carriers.

    But the more generations you can get that have been tested and cleared of the disease, the less risk there is of an unidentified carrier slipping through.

    With all that said, I wouldn't necessarily discount first-generation tested dogs. Health testing isn't something that breeders have been doing forever - it's a response to overwhelming need. And the fact that someone is doing the tests shows an awareness of the issues and indicates a willingness only to use dogs that test clear for breeding. While multiple generations is better, even one generation is very very much better than none at all.
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page