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Over a year old...still not housebroken?

Discussion in 'Dog Training' started by AnnasMom, Apr 10, 2014.

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  1. AnnasMom

    AnnasMom Boxer Pal

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    We adopted a spayed female about 6 weeks ago now, and she is 13 months old. When we first brought her home, she seemed mostly housebroken. Since then it has just deteriorated. We did go through a period where her walks were shortened due to a VERY bad phase of leash biting/acting up/lunging etc. So obviously she ended up relieving herself inside while we worked through that. Now that we're back to long walks, however, she's still going in the house. We use a series of deep clean methods, enzyme cleaners, etc., so I don't think residual smells are the issue. She knows she's supposed to go outside, but she just doesn't seem to be able to (or be willing to) hold it for longer than 2-3 hours. She gets three 15-20 min. walks a day, and every other day she goes to the farm to run and play for an hour on top of that. We're lucky we work from home and can walk her so much, because otherwise the house would be a disaster. She does it mostly when we're not in the room, but sometimes she will just sneak off into a corner and do it when we're just on the other side of the room, and I KNOW she knows better than that.

    I know that people who work 9-5 have boxers, so I know it's doable. How is it that she just can't cope with holding it just a while longer?
     
  2. Jinnytee

    Jinnytee Super Boxer

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    It could be a urinary tract infection, which means she will get a sudden urge to empty her bladder and not be able to hold it long enough to even think about getting outside .... or possibly a side effect of the spaying. The drop in hormones can make the bladder sphincter weak, so a dog is not able to hold her urine as normal.

    I would talk to your vet, to rule out a physiological cause. Especially as you say that you are sure that she KNOWS what she should be doing.

    Good Luck !
     
  3. AnnasMom

    AnnasMom Boxer Pal

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    She just went to the vet and she is perfectly healthy. I think this is definitely a behavior issue, though I'm not sure where it comes from. :-(
     
  4. Jinnytee

    Jinnytee Super Boxer

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    I am so glad that she is healthy ... but it's a bummer as it hasn't resolved your problem. I really don't know what to suggest, to help this behavioral issue .... other than to suggest that you go right back to square one and treat her as a puppy, with pottying after meals, play, sleep, etc, and praise and rewards for correct behavior, while ignoring the negative ... and maybe succeeding in conditioning her to potty "on command" in return for a treat.

    There are some folks on this board who are very experienced boxer owners / trainers, and hopefully someone will have some words of wisdom for you now that you know for sure that its a behavioral problem.

    I do hope you manage to get some help.

    Jinny
     
  5. Kisaq

    Kisaq Super Boxer

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    Are you sure your vet checked for a UTI when you last visited? It won't show up without a test.

    If it truly is not physical, I would go back to basics.
    Keep her leashed to you at all times when she is not crated. That way you can start to recognize her signals for needing to go out. And she won't be able to sneak off to pee out of sight somewhere. Perhaps she was reprimanded (punished) for peeing in the house at some point, and now she is afraid to pee while you are around. She is still settling in... and may never have been house trained.

    You need to try to eliminate the accidents. Get her in the habit of peeing outdoors (and put both pee and poop on a command - immediately she gets a big reward when she goes).

    Have you taken her to a puppy class now that she's settling in? Has the leash biting issues been resolved?
    You have yourself a nice teenager there. :) And sometimes they just loose their brain and genuinely do not remember what they used to know... their minds are on other things seemingly more important. :)
    You kind of have to start back at square one and reinforce the basics.
     
  6. AnnasMom

    AnnasMom Boxer Pal

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    Thanks for all of the input. I think what we have here is an adolescent pup who spent most of her life in a shelter. It's sad, but from what I gather she was passed from one shelter to another, and that's why we don't have much background on her. She probably got housebreaking training here and there, but no consistency. We have started making her sleep in her crate (she used to have free roam of the living room at night), and it seems to be helping. I will try training her to relieve herself on command.

    @kisaq we just completed her first 6 week obedience course this last Wednesday! She has improved a great deal. Thanks for asking! She still attempts to bite the leash at times, but since it's a chain, she won't really grip it or tug on it. She also still goes a little nuts when she sees other dogs, but it is SO much easier to get her to refocus now. The Easy Walk harness has helped immensely too.
     
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