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gingival hyperplasia and periondontal disease

Discussion in 'Dog Health issues and questions' started by axp113, Feb 11, 2011.

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  1. axp113

    axp113 Boxer Booster

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    I just wanted to share my recent experience with Harley. He is a 6 year old boxer and i have been feeding raw food for about 5 years now. For a while his breath smelled really bad and i noticed some overgrown gums in his mouth. so i did some research and realized he probably had gingival hyperplasia and periondontal disease. So we took him to the vet and they confirmed what i thought was going on. They recommeded a dental cleaning, removeal of overgrown gum tissue and tooth extraction, so we set up the dental surgery. After the dental surgery they removed some excess gum tissue and removed 9 teeth (all 6 front teeth on the lower jaw, between the canine teeth), 1 molar and 2 teeth behind the canine teeth.

    One day after the surgery, his teeth look a lot better and the gum tissue looks almost normal, but the vet told me that he has Grade 3 (moderate periondontal disease). The before and after pictures show a big improvement from what it was. I know the gum tissue will probably grow back and was wondering if there is anything that could be done to help delay the re-growth of this tissue? I am going to make more of an effort to brush his teeth so i can prevent any more teeth being removed.

    Now i read the Raw Meaty Bones book a long time ago and it really gave me a great perspective on RAW feeding, thus making the switch to RAW, one of the best things i have ever done. So, i thought that might prevent something like this happening, but i am wondering if this was more due to a genetic factor than a feeding factor?

    I feed both my boxers raw food, chicken, turkey, rabbit, duck, fish... they love it. My other boxer (Bella) has no signs of bad breath, overgrown gums or "dirty" teeth. But Harley did, so that is why i think genetics may have had some part in this. Bella is more of a chewer and will chew on bones forever, Harley on the other hand is not a big chewer. This may also factor into why his teeth are the way they are.
     
  2. Gatorblu

    Gatorblu Boxer Insane

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    My first boxer had gingival hyperplasia. She had surgery to remove it and was told there was a chance it would come back. I think she was about 7 at the time of the surgery, and she lived to 10 without any repeat of it. She would chew bones and such ocassionally, but not very often. I have two more boxers, Thor 9, and Arabella 4. I haven't seen any signs of it with either of them and I don't think either of them chew anymore than Star. I think it just the luck of the draw, and there maybe a few factors. One huge difference with Star is she was very sick when we first got her and a couple of vets have suggested that may have compromised her immune system, thus making her more suceptible to many things. She was an extremely allergic dog.

    Some have suggested chewing on antler is good for cleaning their teeth. We got antlers for the first time 3 mos ago and my dogs will chew on them maybe once or twice a week.
     
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