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Cleft Palate... What to do?

Discussion in 'Dog Health issues and questions' started by owensmj, Jun 24, 2004.

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  1. owensmj

    owensmj Boxer Pal

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    Our dog just gave birth to her first litter of boxer puppies on Tuesday. This morning, I noticed one pup was not nursing well, she also looked skinnier than the other pups. Took her to the vet, the vet looked at her and discovered she has a cleft palate. There are surgery options after tube feeding her for a few weeks, but everything I've read suggests putting the puppy to sleep to prevent any further infection. I'm very torn on what to do.... any opinions???
     
  2. Sidda1018

    Sidda1018 Super Boxer

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    I have no experience or advice for you. When I read your post all I could think of is my skin brother was born with a cleft palate and I am glad they can fix it with humans rather than give up.
    I guess it is still different with animals :(
     
  3. Draymia

    Draymia BW Adviser<br><img src="/forums/images/modpaw.gif"

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    A lot depends on how bad it is. If goes all the way back into the throat and exposes the nasal cavities, it is best to consider euthanasia. Your vet should be able to tell you how bad and what kind of success rate you might have with surgery. I have had two cleft palates in the last 30 years. Both were large and I opted for euthanasia. Talk to your vet. You have to think of what is best for the puppy as sometimes you are looking at several surgeries to correct a bad one and the surgery is not always successful.
     
  4. Evie&Adam

    Evie&Adam Boxer Insane

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    Though I've never dealt with this in dogs, I have in humans, my step sister's neice was born with a BAD cleft. She is now 10 and has way too many surgeries to count. She is healthy, happy and finally adjusting to a more normal life. With a pup, you need to weigh the heath of the dog, the severity, and the quality of life the pup would have after surgery. Either way you decide, We know that you will be doing what you (and possibly the vet) feel is best for the pup.

    Keep up posted.
     
  5. owensmj

    owensmj Boxer Pal

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    Thanks for the advice & support. We put baby Mambo down this evening. She's in a better place now... she's in doggie heaven with all the dogs I had growing up. We miss her, but know we did the right thing. Please pray for our other 4 pups... we know they don't have cleft palates, but I just hope all goes well with them in the next 7 weeks! Thanks again for the help.
     
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