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Adopting a Pit Mix....ADVICE please!

Discussion in 'Other Pets' started by GuthriesDad, Feb 18, 2013.

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Do you leave your dogs out unattended?

Poll closed Feb 25, 2013.
  1. Yes

    2 vote(s)
    22.2%
  2. No

    6 vote(s)
    66.7%
  3. Depends on the dog

    1 vote(s)
    11.1%
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  1. GuthriesDad

    GuthriesDad Boxer Pal

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    So, I'm not sure if this is the right forum to post this, but hopefully some of you out there can help.

    We've been thinking about getting a second dog for a few months now. By chance, we happened to have Guthrie with us at the pet store when the humane society was there with a couple of dogs for adoption. A beautiful "pit bull mix" caught my eye and Guthrie's. She is quite small, maybe 12 inches tall, and no more than 30 lbs (so the size differential piece is there) and 4+ months older than Guthrie. They immediately started play bowing and sniffing each other, it seemed like quite the match made in heaven. We're thinking about going in today to pick her up for a home trial.

    (I put "pit bull mix" in quotes up there because it seems like 9 out of every 10 dogs that go in there are labeled like that, whether or not they are.)

    I started researching pit bulls, though, and now I'm a little concerned. She seemed so calm and submissive, but now I'm reading about dogs whose Dog Agression just "turns on" one day. For this reason, they advise never leaving one unattended with another dog.

    One of the reasons we're thinking about getting a second dog at all is because of how enormously dog social Guthrie is. We've babysat dogs for friends and family, and he loves it...he's not a resource guarder, no problems sharing space, he just loves having a playmate. He's only alone for a few hours a day, but I was planning to leave him unconfined with his playmate.

    So, I know there are a few Staffie and Am Staff owners on BW, and my question is mostly to you and other "pit mix" owners out there. Do you leave your dogs alone together? What's the consensus?
     
  2. LILYLARUE

    LILYLARUE Boxer Insane

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    I can give my two cents worth here:

    I have two pit mixes - one staffy/boxer the other pit?/hound mix. Both are very submissive. I leave all four dogs out alone when I am at work, but only after 2 years of monitoring their behaviors and reactions. BUT When I had a female staffordshire, she was ALWAYS crated. This was mostly because of having two female bullies in the house - didn't take any risks.

    Since you may be adopting a female - my suggestion would be to always crate her when you can't be there to monitor. I always fall on the safe side - heard to many stories of friends coming home to a dead dog. Just not worth the risk as far as I'm concerned. And some females are more reactive than males, often only giving slight if not invisible to human eyes, indicators.

    Pit bulls DO NOT just snap (unless they have a medical, neurological or psychological issues. What people may refer to "snap" is that they do have a high threshold of tolerance BUT then that cliff is pretty steep, and they do have an end to the tolerance. This is the point where they go from loving to pretty darn serious. They just put up with so much, then they hit their wall and it's game on for discipline. Most humans who are not bully savvy, may not see those slight or invisible indicators that something is about to go on. If a first time pit owner, I often match them with the most stable and reliable pibbles. I only match the hard to handle or needs a good leader to keep the dog in check. With this strong breed, physically and mentally, you gotta always be on top, if not one step ahead. Trust me, it can be exhausting some times with 4 to monitor and referee. But, it does get easier if you stick to the rules you set and don't deviate or slack. That will help ensure that the bully knows the rules, boundries and such and won't press the luck. Though, they do have a tendance to push the limits sometimes - but being a strong, confident and in control leader gives them a clear understanding of expectations. And bullies, no matter the breed, will do whatever it takes to please their humans - including following the rules or fighting cause it pleases the owner.

    I ALWAYS suggest crating a dog for at least 6 months til you get an understanding of their tolerance level, how they react when their threshold is reached, how they may guard toys, how they recover from an excitable event, and how they interact with your other dog/s. Sometimes they need to always be crated when alone, some are just too unpredictable.

    Pits/mixes make great playmates for boxers. They sort of have that same, full on, playstyle. BUT so you know, they are also just as loud in playing, often sounding like a loud fight like boxers. Typically, thats the one of the rare times you will hear a pittie bark or make noise. And what a noise they make!!! LOL

    If she is as small as you say and she's an adult, my best guess would be she is a staffordshire bull terrier.......The original "nanny dog" and originally from Europe/England, bred for being extremely gentle, loving, devoted family/child dogs. They were also bred with other bully breeds to use in bull baiting and dog fighting. As you can imagine, they often didn't make the fight stock, but were the bait dogs for other more aggressive dogs to practice on. Hence, why they had to breed them with larger, more aggressive, less human loving bully breeds. Staffy's alone make horrible fighters. In fact, most often they avoid confrontation at all costs. Most shelter workers can not distinquish between the bully breeds, so "pit mix" is the "go to" breed. Which is really a detriment to that dog labeled as such. Which is also why BSL shouldn't exist - even breeders of bully's can't distinquish one from the other, so how do officials think they can?

    Anyways, I hope I gave some advice that gives more insight to your decision. Personally, being a bully lover, I won't own any other breeds than boxers and pibbles. I love the devotion, the loving nature, the constant need to be by my side, and of course, their silly, funny, comical outlook on life. Guaranteed a lifetime of laughter!
     
  3. GuthriesDad

    GuthriesDad Boxer Pal

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    Yeah, my guess was that she's a Staffie mix for the same reasons...here's her listing, you can see if you agree:
    Petango.com

    Thanks for the advice! You have definitely put my mind at ease about this!
     
  4. GuthriesDad

    GuthriesDad Boxer Pal

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    Oops...double post.
     
    Last edited: Feb 18, 2013
  5. LILYLARUE

    LILYLARUE Boxer Insane

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    OH MY!!! Now I see how you could fall for her!!! Yes, I think a staffy. Based on her "less than block head" and her size. She may fill out the second year and get a bit bulkier, but height wise, she won't grow much more.

    I will say, the "blue" pits can be more unpredictable than the other colors. This is because the "blue color" is anomily and shouldn't be bred, like white boxers. It's a mutated gene. So breeding causes a percentage of the pups to carry the mutated gene. BUT she has some white on her, and seems to have an underlying brown tone......so, I wouldn't be concerned to much if the mutated gene had affected any other aspects of her development.

    Out of all the pits I have worked with, the blues were the most difficult. BUT I can almost say for sure it was due to poor breeding to begin with.

    I am fostering a 5 mos. old now - mother was a red nose, father a blue.......I can tell he has some impulse issues, but is responding to training very well. If these impulse issues continue, I can guess it's due to the "blue father" and the mutated gene that may be affecting his thought sequence. It's just getting him to think things through before reacting - getting his thought process to work complete and not go from eyes to amigdala and then to reaction. This is the process that aggressive dogs or overly reactive dogs skip too. It's due to repetetive actions, the dog predicts, and goes from seeing to reacting without thinking the whole thing through. Teaching a dog to await the process is often the difficult part of the training.......some dogs thought process is severed, only relying on the amigdala to get the info to react a certain way. Very interesting study, but got bored after about an hour of that lesson - stopped my thought process and went right to my amigdala and then outside for a reactionary cigg. LOL
     
  6. GuthriesDad

    GuthriesDad Boxer Pal

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    She definitely does have a bit of brindle underlying the blue.

    I had never heard about the issue with the blue gene before, how interesting! That's why I love this board :)

    Like I said, she could not have been more calm and sweet to us (me, my girlfriend, her 7yo son) or to Guthrie. None of the posturing you sometimes see when dogs first meet...they loved each other immediately!

    You have put my mind at ease about this. I think we're going to do it.

    Thanks!!
     
  7. Sansal

    Sansal Boxer Insane

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    She looks very sweet lovicon If I were you I would enroll into a training class right away (Positive reward-based). It'll help you build a relationship with her (and it's fun). Keep us posted!
     
  8. packblt

    packblt Completely Boxer Crazy

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    She's very adorable:). Looks like a real sweetie!
     
  9. EAO76

    EAO76 Boxer Insane

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    I do boxer rescue adoptions and I always tell my adopters to keep the dogs separated in the beginning. I know of people who have come home to find one of two Boxers dead so its not a just Pitbull thing. Always error on the side of caution until you are sure. It can happen to anyone. This is a great site to learn more about pit bull type dogs and the issues that affect them. There is so much fantastic info on this site you can read for days.
    Home | BAD RAP
     
  10. LILYLARUE

    LILYLARUE Boxer Insane

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    I second the Bad Rap Site. They are chock full of info and very responsive to emails. Great group with only positive pittie advice!
     
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