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A mind of his own

Discussion in 'Dog Training' started by Jules, Aug 11, 2000.

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  1. Jules

    Jules Boxer Pal

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    We just started obedience school with our 9 mo. old male, Newman. We weren't having much success with a choker, so the instructor suggusted a pinch collar. We agreed to try it,with success. He obeys our commands much better, but sometimes Newman reacts aggressively when he has it on. If we correct him too much, he snarls at us, and jumps up to "eat" our hands(you know how boxers wrap their front paws around your arm). He just constantly challenges us for the dominant role. Will it get better?

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    Julie
    Newman's mom-flashy fawn w/ natural ears 11/5/00
     
  2. Brutus and Amaya's Mom

    Brutus and Amaya's Mom Boxer Insane

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    Domiance can be hard to correct and takes a lot of work but can be done. Brutus is a very confident, dominant dog and we are still working with him. I'm glad to hear you are in training because that is the first step. You should ask your trainer about methods to help solve dominance. Here us a list of things we had to do. If you keep at it it does get better. Brutus is being tested for his Canine good citizen test in a few weeks and the trainer is positive he will pass.

    1) Try sitting on the floor with the dog on a leash. Sit on the leash giving the dog about 4inches of slack. This forces him down and shows you can make him. Sit for 20minutes to 1/2 hr per day.
    2) Keep him off furniture. When he is allowed on the furniture he thinks he is equal to you.
    3) No sleeping in bed (sorry) same thing as the furniture. Bru slept in a kennel.
    4) Make sure you eat before the dog. In the wild the top dog eats first. By feeding the dog first you are saying (in dog language) that he is the most important and deserves to eat first.
    5) Try to walk out door or up steps first. Top dog leads the other dogs around.

    It really is a process and a lifestyle but if you try this the dog should figure it out after awhile. I'd be happy to help more, email me if needed.



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    Brutus & Amayas Mom
    Brutus 9/23/99 Flashy Fawn
    Amaya 3/22/00 Flashy Brindle
     
  3. Heather

    Heather Boxer Pal

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    Hi! I am glad you asked for people's opinions, mine is that this will only get worse using a method of training that involves a pinch colalr. You are getting into a battle with him a dangerous thing to do with a young, strong dog! I would suggest using less invasive methods of trainng. i.e. clicker training. If you want more info please email me privately at Nook98@hotmail.com
    Best of Luck!

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    Heather Nook98@hotmail.com
    Louie-2yr old neutered fawn Boxer
     
  4. Kira

    Kira Boxer Buddy

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    I am really concerned to hear that your obedience trainer is dealing with a 9 month old puppy via choke and pinch collars.

    I suspect that if he's reacting "aggressively" to the pinch it's because you're hurting him with it. I don't know that this is a dominance reaction or a survival reaction.

    There's no need for excessive corrections in training. If the dogs needs more than 2 corrections, he doesn't understand what you want and you have to be clearer in your communication.

    You have to have soft hands and excellent timing to use a pinch collar properly and not stress the dog. Some dogs do better on a pinch with plastic tips over the prongs or a cloth sleeve over the collar.

    I use a pinch on my competitive dogs for polishing their heeling and attention work but I am very subtle in my corrections and the dogs were trained up to competitive level on flat collars.

    If you're having trouble controlling him on leash, use a Halti or Gentle Leader to give you control over his head.

    That all being said, your own training learning curve cannot and should not be short-cut with equipment.

    If I were you, I'd find a motivational trainer who focuses on behaviour and can help you set the rules for this boy without resorting to harsh corrections.

    An excellent book is Benjamin's "How to Survive your Dog's Adolescence" and the training book "So Your Dog's Not Lassie".

    Best of luck.
     
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